recent bookmarks

Products - Cafe-Analog
Stationery, washi tape, stamps, notepads...
journaling  gifts 
1 minute ago by fairyrevel
Twitter
The parent company of Unibet said it wanted to get into the US sports betting business last month. Now it appears it will be a reality in New Jersey after today's deal: ªªhttps://buff.ly/2MmnRLs ºº

via Twitter Search / LSPReport https://twitter.com/LSPReport
LECTURAS  FEEDLY  SPORTalk 
2 minutes ago by leconeyc
Amazon has reportedly lost its smart speaker dominance to Google — Quartz
Amazon has reportedly lost its smart speaker dominance https://ift.tt/2OHFbqM Prospective https://ift.tt/2L3Z9Kd August 17, 2018 at 05:05PM

Google has found its groove in the smart speaker market, nearly doubling the number of devices it shipped in the last year to 5.4 million units, and eclipsing Amazon—which shipped 4.1 million during the same time period.

The worldwide smart-speaker market is still seeing massive growth, with 187% more units than in the second quarter of 2017, according to a report from the market-research firm Canalys. And it’s not just Google and Amazon shipping in mass quantities: Chinese companies have seen strong growth, capturing nearly 30% of the market in the last year. Apple, which produces the HomePod, did not make the list.

Chinese companies Alibaba and Xiaomi captured the third- and fourth-place slots on the leaderboard, shipping roughly 3 million and 2 million smart speakers respectively. The two account for more than 90% market share in China, Canalys reports.

Global trade has been a hallmark of the last year’s growth, with Europe and Asia counting for 68% of Amazon’s growth and 58% of Google’s, as the companies increase the number of languages their devices support. This could be a sign that the US market is starting to get saturated, as recent updates of Amazon’s speakers have offered few incentives to upgrade. After all, consumers generally just use their smart speakers for playing music, setting timers, and getting the weather.

https://qz.com Quartz http://qz.com/feed/ August 17, 2018 at 05:05PM
Prospective 
2 minutes ago by SergioWerner
Twitter
The @ActionNetworkHQ wants to be a sports gambling unicorn. Can it make a billion dollars? For @slate, I went to New York to find out: ªªhttps://slate.com/business/2018/08/the-action-network-wants-to-be-a-sports-betting-unicorn-will-it-make-a-billion-or-be-a-bust.html …ºº

via Twitter Search / LSPReport https://twitter.com/LSPReport
LECTURAS  FEEDLY  SPORTalk 
2 minutes ago by leconeyc
"Shark Tank" meets book publishing | MIT News
"Shark Tank" meets book publishing https://ift.tt/2nJ9stZ Prospective https://ift.tt/2vSTyBJ August 17, 2018 at 05:01PM

Do you have a great idea for a nonfiction book in science or technology, broadly defined? Editors receive hundreds of inquires each year. But what makes one book project stand out from the rest?

In the spirit of fun and fostering the Boston publishing scene, the MIT Press is hosting its first-ever Pitchfest competition.

Pitchfest will give six contestants the opportunity to present their best science or technology book idea before a panel of judges and a live audience at the Boston Book Festival on Oct. 13 in Boston. The winner will be given the opportunity to workshop a full-fledged book proposal with an MIT Press editor, get advice on how to navigate the publishing world, and receive a $1,000 cash prize.

The deadline for submissions is Sept. 1, after which time finalists will be selected and given offers to participate in the event. Pitchfest is an open competition and anyone is welcome to submit a proposal.

The MIT Press is a leading publisher of books and journals at the intersection of science, technology, and the arts. MIT Press books and journals are known for their intellectual daring, scholarly standards, and distinctive design.

https://ift.tt/1E8hcei MIT News https://ift.tt/2EzGdBx August 17, 2018 at 05:01PM
Prospective 
2 minutes ago by SergioWerner
Publishing Triangle
sign in 'There remains another room to walk into' Sarah Schulman’s Reflections on LGBT Publishing in the Trump Era Here is the speech Sarah Schulman gave in…
Instapaper 
2 minutes ago by edmadrid
How to Successfully Declutter Your Basement
Trying to declutter your basement can be very overwhelming! Whether you are preparing to remodel your basement or just want to clear some space, here is how to successfully declutter your basement.
basement-remodel  home-improvement  storage-space 
3 minutes ago by Adventure_Web
4 Tips For Writing Your Own Wedding Vows
Writing vows is very romantic and beautiful, but it’s not always easy to write down your thoughts and feelings in a few short sentences. Be sure to read out tips to help you put your emotions into words that are sure to bring tears to your partner’s eyes!
vows  wedding  wedding-ceremony 
3 minutes ago by Adventure_Web
Twitter
GreenAmethyst #Ring #Green #SolidSilver #Gemstone #MostJewellery #GoodSeller #SisterGift #GiftForFathers #Instacanvas #Riyoin #Ring #GrünerAmethyst #MassivesSilber #Grün #Anneau #AméthysteVerte #ArgentMassif #Vert #Anillo… https://t.co/jlOXiRljRk pic.twitter.com/axvnkJhkgJ

— Riyogems (@Riyogems) August 17, 2018
IFTTT  Twitter 
3 minutes ago by riyogems
4 Signs That Your Air Ducts May Need a Professional Cleaning August 17, 2018
Much like the variety of positive effects that a duct cleaning has on your HVAC unit efficiency and air quality, there are also many signs to look for when determining if a duct cleaning is necessary for your home.
air-ducts  general  cleaning-service 
3 minutes ago by Adventure_Web
9 DIY Smart Home Automation Projects for a Shoestring Budget
Smart home appliances are more popular than ever. The Internet of Things (IoT) unifies everything from lighting to full security systems. Once separate systems, many things in the home are now controllable from a smartphone. As a new technology, some elements of home automation do not come cheap. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  makeuseof 
3 minutes ago by dcolanduno
Cutting the Gordian Knot — The American Magazine
By Pejman Yousefzadeh

The emerging policy consensus that we ought to do something to limit carbon emissions faces two fundamental challenges. First, it remains difficult to measure the impact of any policy on the actual level of emissions. Second, these policies may impose substantial economic harms, which are also hard to measure. An ideal policy response to the danger of global warming would both monitor the degree to which human activities are leading to warming, and adjust the incentives so that once the desired level of emissions reduction is reached, no further harm is imposed on the economy.

Fortunately, economist Ross McKitrick has found a way to do just that with a very innovative twist on the carbon tax idea. McKitrick argues that for each country, the dollar rate of the carbon tax be pegged to the three-year average change in global tropical temperatures.* The tax would be assessed per ton of carbon dioxide emissions, and updated annually. It would be administered for all domestic carbon dioxide emissions, be matched with income tax cuts and would come with no cap on emissions.

Implementing a carbon tax that is tied to warming and a futures market are ideas whose time has come.
Currently, according to McKitrick, the tax would come out to $4.70 per ton, which is rather low. But if global warming forecasts are correct, the tax would eventually climb at a rate of between $4 and $24 per decade, according to McKitrick’s findings. He calculates that if the current upper end of forecasts hold, the tax could reach $200 per ton by 2100, which would necessitate a move to non-carbon energy sources and an effort to cut carbon emissions.

Of course, it is possible that the current models will not hold, which would mean that the tax would increase very little, if at all. As McKitrick points out, it is even possible—according to some scientists—that we might experience global cooling, in which case we could end up subsidizing carbon emissions.

These two scenarios—and all of the scenarios in between—highlight the uncertainty in our climate future. McKitrick’s proposed carbon tax allows us to measure the degree to which human activity is contributing to global warming by looking at the tax rate. If increases in the tax rate lead to decreases in warming, then the alarmists are right about our impact on climate—if it doesn’t, they are not. As McKitrick himself says, with this tax, “the regulator gets to call everyone’s bluff at once, without gambling in advance on who is right.” Moreover, the structure of the tax will encourage both public and private sector forecasting that will take global warming into account and will decrease the lag between the effects of climate change and the design and implementation of policy options to address that change.

We can add to or amend McKitrick’s proposal by taking into account economist Arnold Kling’s idea of having a futures market in the temperature indicator, where the tax is tied to the futures price. I’m a big fan of futures markets; the Iowa Electronics Market has an excellent reputation for correctly predicting the outcome of Presidential elections and futures markets would even help forecast—and prevent—terrorist attacks if only people got over some of their squeamishness. Tying a futures market to the carbon tax McKitrick envisions would go a long way towards making the tax rational.

Implementing a carbon tax that is tied to warming and a futures market are ideas whose time has come. Both the tax and the futures market will help lend greater certainty to the climate debate. Intellectual checks and balances will be imposed on each side. And since no particular liberty principle is at issue, the taxation of externalities is certainly something free market types like me can get behind. It is better than the taxation of income, after all.

Or as Bill Murray put it in Ghostbusters, “I like this plan! I'm proud to be a part of it!”

* Specifically, McKitrick proposes that the tax rate be equal to twenty times the three-year moving average of the "mean tropical tropospheric temperature anomaly"—a measure of the change in average temperatures in the lower atmosphere between 20° North and 20° South latitudes, the broad belt tropical belt around the equator.

<i>Pejman Yousefzadeh is an attorney living in Illinois. He blogs at A Chequer-board of Nights and Days, and Red State.</i>
climate  markets  Pejman  Yousefzadeh  taxes  carbon 
3 minutes ago by bafusilier
Our new course on using 1Password, some interesting apps we're trying this week, and more – The Sweet Setup
Our new course on using 1Password, some interesting apps we’re trying this week, and more
thesweetsetup 
4 minutes ago by edan
« earlier      

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags:



Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: